Wayne, your presentations at our Professional Development Day were enjoyable and instructive. Leadership, and successful project management, starts with having the ability to communicate clearly, and we greatly appreciate you sharing your expertise with our Chapter.

I'm happy to lend my voice to let other PMI chapters know what an engaging and informative speaker you are.

C. Shankar - PMI Westchester
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Issue #17 October 2009

SWaynePow'Rful Presentations Newsletter
 
 
October 2009 - Prepare for your next promotion in tough times
 
Pow'Rful Presentations is a relatively monthly investigation of ideas, strategies and techniques to help you be more present in life, a better project manager and make more effective presentations (in all senses of the word).
  
© Wayne Botha 2009
 
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How to get your next promotion
(or simply keep your current job)
 
How do you keep on believing and delivering your best to your employer amidst fears of being laid off? How do you do everything you can to keep your job? How can you even get a promotion in these tough times when budgets are frozen and salaries are being cut?
 
The poem that stands out in tough times, is "IF" by Rudyard Kipling. Find it online and read it again if you haven't look it over in the recent past. The opening lines are "If you can keep your head when all about you are losing their and blaming it on you...". Let's not kid ourselves - it is hard to go through rounds of layoffs.
 
Here is what I have learned over the past 26 years of full-time employment. I wish that I could take credit for all of this, but in truth, I have learned this advice from other people.
 
1. Be visible. Even though your metaphorical rubber stamping process in the back office is the best in the world, you are less likely to be promoted if no-one knows you. Help out where ever you can and volunteer for cross-departmental activities. Talk to people in other departments and build professional relationships to become known.
 
2. Get a professional coach. You can't see your blind spots even if they are painfully obvious to your colleagues and your manager. Your minimal financial investment will pay off in spades when you become aware of your blind spots and take appropriate action. Your professional coach will also help you see new opportunities that you are overlooking and nudge you into taking advantage of these opportunities.
 
3. Look for a mentor. Pay attention to seniors in your office. If you are a project manager, look around for program managers with experience in your organization. Then ask if you can bounce ideas around before you take decisions. Respect your mentor's time and remember that you are still independent while you take your mentor's advice into consideration.  
 
4. Never eat lunch alone. Read a book on how to network. Then set a target of having lunch with someone everyday so that you can build mutually beneficial relationships. Learn about their area of the organization and seek to add value to the relationship.
 
5. Don't complain. How do you feel when co-workers complain to you about everything. Do you want to hear their opinions on the lack of parking, the lousy salary or price of gas? I bet that you do not want to hear other people complain. Then don't complain either. Be part of a solutions not part of a problem.
 
6. Get involved in your industry association. Join your local chapter of PMI (if you are a Project Manager). Then volunteer to join a committee. Show people that you are involved in advancing your profession. Make friends at these events.
 
There you have it. Six simple steps to help you be a valued employee which places you in the admirable position of earning a promotion in tough times. Keep your head while all about you are losing theirs.
 
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Tips for Toastmasters.
If you are in Toastmasters, then this tip will help you to get more out of your journey. 
Learn how the pros do it. Study professional speakers, and see what they do in their speeches. Then see if you can incorporate techniques from the professional speakers in your Toastmaster speeches.
 
I purchased inexpensive audio recordings and audio products at on online auction website to study the styles and techniques of professional speakers. You should add audio CD's from the great speakers such as Zig Ziglar and Larry Winget to your personal public speaking library. Top flight professional speakers have unique insights, personal stories, delivery skills and well-rehearsed humor.
 
Study professional speakers to improve your Toastmaster speeches. Then share your learnings with your club, so that others can also benefit from your research.
 
 
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Do you know someone who is stuck and not progressing towards a goal? Contact me and I will schedule a sample coaching session to see if we can work together.
 
Do you need a speaker for your conference? Contact me and let's discuss if I am the right speaker for your event.
 
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View Wayne Botha's profile on LinkedIn
 

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Email me with any problems or questions that you have about project management or presentations and I will attempt to address them in a future newsletter.

More next time!

Wayne Botha
  


Copyright 2017 Wayne Botha Email Wayne Cell: 860.214.4897